Blog

InternMatch Student Blog

5 Tools to Creating Your Own Website – No Coding Needed

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Ting Jung Lee on
Apr. 24, 2014

In today’s savvy and competitive world, company recruiters are looking for candidates to stand out from the piles and piles of application they receive on a daily basis. Studies show that job recruiters spend a max of six seconds looking at your resume. Only six seconds? If that’s all a paper resume gets, then it just doesn’t cut it. Nowadays recruiters are looking for more and here’s the secret to wowing them:

Create your own personal website.

That’s right. It’s time to transform that paper resume into its digital form. Here are three benefits of having your own personal website:

  • You get your foot wet in branding.
    When you build your own personal website, you are creating a space for yourself online. What you say on it and what you put on it becomes your brand. By having something solid about yourself to exhibit to the world, you are telling recruiters that you know how to market yourself and am not afraid to show it.
  • More space to show who you are.
    A website allows you to add pages, insert images, post videos, write blog posts, and put whatever it is you wish others to see. You can show off your hobbies, your thoughts, and anything that highlights you in a positive light. It gives recruiters a larger view of who you are. They may be in like with your work experience, but fall in love with your personality.
  • You’re a diamond in the rough!
    Everyone is on social media. So are recruiters. 91% of recruiters use social networking sites to screen prospective employees. What this means is they’re flipping through your Twitter, searching you on Facebook, and seeing if you’re active on other social platforms. Even though this is an obvious fact, most students do not acknowledge it and focus too little on monitoring and building their online presence. Only 7% of job seekers actually have a personal website according to Workfolio. If you build a personal website, you are added to the elite group of students who stand out – and get hired.

Now, the hardest part is always getting the site built. Most students are not web developers and hey, that’s totally fine! You may not know how to code, you may not be tech savvy, but you may not worry. There’s plenty of resources you can utilize to get yourself on the web.

Here’s five FREE and easy tools to creating your own personal website: (more…)


Finding your passion

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Adam Jorgensen on
Apr. 24, 2014

Ніжний_ранковий_світлоPassion: A strong and barely controllable emotion

Passion in a career is hard to find. A passionate career leaves one engorged with joy and eagerness to take on the next day’s grind.

You can find your passion at a part time job at a gas station, filling people’s tanks and dishing out jokes with their morning coffee purchases. Of course there are those who have typical 9 to 5 jobs with a commute, and end up fatigued and disappointed. Avoiding the misery and never-ending boredom of adulthood can be a difficult task.

How to find your passion?

Well, that is a unique process. It’s not something you can find on the street, buy at your local super center, or order online. However you may stumble across it when you least expect. Sure there are sites out there boasting how accurate their “career matching” results are, but you must pave your own path. Career matching guidelines are merely suggestions based on statistics. They may be relevant to some but not others. You could be pegged as a future OBGYN while your true passion lies in the culinary arts. Rather far off, eh?

(more…)


Finding Your Pitch at the Interview

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 24, 2014

This is a guest post by Sherry Zou for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

51e215b0dc67a2d8c654300093461b1f

If you think a well-polished resume and professional attire are all you need for an interview, you are clearly wrong. At an interview, an employer is not only judging you by your outward appearances, but also by your speaking skills. In other words, an employer is looking and judging you from all perspectives; most importantly your 60 second pitch when an employer asks you to tell him or her about yourself in the beginning of the interview.

(more…)


Embracing the Exciting Unknown of Your First Post-Grad Year

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 24, 2014

This is a guest post by Brittany Spear for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

095

I’ve been told time and time again that college is our greatest time for growth and change – but I disagree. While college is a place with a wealth of opportunity for new experiences and ways to grow your character, it was nothing in comparison to the experiences that awaited me in the post-graduation world of job searches, work, and discovery.

A year ago, I was sitting in my senior year college house, a month away from graduation and still jobless, having just been turned down from the two full-time jobs I had been applying to for the past two months. I had no plan, no direction, and no idea what I was doing. In a few words, I was half-paralyzed with fear over the undetermined future before me.

(more…)


Communication: Essential to All Business Relationships

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 23, 2014

This is a guest post by Mary for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

Communication

Before I started my internship, I thought the most challenging part of my new position (‘Accounting and Finance Intern’) would be fulfilling my job description. However, I soon realized that I was capable of doing my tasks easily enough. The real challenge of my internship, was working with some of my colleagues. I always thought I was good with people (after being told so many times), but I soon realized that being able to interact with people was not the same as creating solutions with co-workers.

One of my main projects, throughout my internship, was to update forms so that my colleagues had the necessary tools to comply with new legislation associated with the Affordable Health Care Act.  I was also tasked with informing employees about how they would be affected by the new legislation and what they would need to do to comply with these laws.

(more…)


5 Ways to Excel in Drama and Theater

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 23, 2014

This is a guest post by Rob Sutter for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

Joescena

Amongst the many types of art that can be talked about, it’s easy to say that theater is one of the most demanding. Not only do actors and actresses have to look certain ways in order to land roles but they have to be able to portray characters as well. As one can imagine, this is more of a challenge for some than it is for others. If you would like to truly excel in either drama or theater, art schools will have you covered.

 Here are 5 ways to ensure that your presence on stage is as strong as possible.

(more…)


Snatching Your First Job

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 23, 2014

This is a guest post by Ashley Bender  for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

job-search-276893_640

Looking for your first real job can be tough. Most companies want you to have experience, whether it’s flipping burgers at McDonalds, following an interest to work for a newspaper, or working in a warehouse. That first job fuels the formation of a good resume and begins the metamorphosis from a dependent kid to an independent adult.

As a freshman in college it became apparent that I couldn’t live off of microwavable Mac and Cheese, which I often messed up, and I was up to my waist in loans. I needed a job, even if it was only in the summer to help with finances during the school year. During high school I used to dog sit for my neighbor and worked as a gate guard at my neighborhood pool. I earned less than minimum wage and had no real company experience. So I searched both through the internet and in person for a part-time job near where I lived. I sent out application after application to various different companies. Despite my best efforts, I couldn’t get a positive word and if I managed to get an interview, I still didn’t get the job.

(more…)


How to Destroy the Job Hunt – From an Investment Banker

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 22, 2014

This is a guest post by Justin  for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

Bankers

Without a doubt, getting a job in investment banking with a top firm is statistically impossible.

Out of the couple of left over full time spots allotted to your prestigious university from each respective firm, you’ll compete against the best, brightest and most connected individuals from your graduating class. Being that I’ve been able to do so despite having several disadvantages (i.e., lack of business fraternity affiliation) using specific tactics, I believe that my template for becoming a highly competitive applicant will be applicable to students seeking employment in industries including, but not limited to, investment banking.

 I believe there are three main barriers preventing you from being a competitive applicant: qualifications, cultural fit and effective interview skills. Another “x factor” that you can leverage to differentiate yourself is proper networking strategy/execution. Let me explain:

(more…)


Navigating the Post-College World

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Thomas Martino on
Apr. 22, 2014

This is a guest post by Kirsten Anderson for InternMatch’s Student Stories. If you’re interested in getting involved with Student Stories, learn more here.

I graduated

It’s April 2013 and I am eagerly awaiting my graduation ceremony on the 18th. Things will be different; I will no longer be a student slaving away at assignments and can finally do what I want to do; achieve goals that I sacrificed in order to attain a college degree; I cannot wait to be finished.

Fast forward a few months and I’m wishing I were still a student. Trading my Spring Breaks and three-day-a-week class schedule for working full-time at a coffee shop was not my idea of post-graduation life. To say the least, post-graduation life was not what I expected. That’s not to say that graduating wasn’t what I wanted – I just had different expectations.

Most students expect to get a salaried job worthy of a four-year degree. But in the current circumstances of this country, that isn’t always the case. In fact, I found myself working with high schoolers and people who had never gone to college when I first graduated and began working at a coffee shop. As much as I can complain about not landing my dream job straight out of college, these smaller jobs have allowed me to start thinking about where I want to go and what I would like to do.

(more…)


#MySideProject: An Application to Google Like No Other

Brown_arrow_21 Posted by Ting Jung Lee on
Apr. 17, 2014

#MySideProject profiles awesome side projects from the InternMatch community! Working on something cool, or know of a friend who’s working on something awesome? Email: [email protected]

Carlos Villalobos (@carlosvivaldi), globetrotter and student entrepreneur, goes above and beyond what Google’s internship application asked for to stand out from the crowd. How? He proposed a game changing initiative to promote Google Maps. Oh, and he posted it online for the whole world to see.

Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I grew up in El Salvador, went to a British high school that put a lot of emphasis on international experiences. I applied to Northeastern University  because of its leadership opportunities as well as their co-op program. I am currently pursuing a major in Finance & Entrepreneurship. Well, I started off as a marketing major, and did my first co-op, six month internship, at Adobe Systems in San Francisco, California. I discovered that marketing in a classroom environment wasn’t something that I was looking for, so I switched into Finance to gain more technical, hands-on skills. In general, I’m fascinated by technology and seek every chance I get to fiddle with the newest gadgets out there. My other interests include going out for coffee, brunch, running and photography.

What position at Google were you applying for? How did you stumble upon it?

During my second co-op program, people kept telling me that now was the time to start building my network and they were right. I wasn’t going to wait until graduation to put this networks to work, so I decided to start reaching out to people in the technology industry in the efforts of getting my second co-op. I cold called and e-mailed recruiters in the industry until one thing led to another. An opportunity came abroad – the Google BOLD internship program. I was rejected during the first round of applications but I wasn’t going to take no for answer — not for something I had worked so hard on. In about a week I put together the Google initiative project and sent it back to the recruiter who originally sent the rejection e-mail.

(more…)


Back to Top